Danse Macabre

 Danse Macabre

 

 

Japanese maple - Acer palmatum

100x170 cm - edition of 3 plus artist’s proof

Danse macabre imagery is thought to have arisen in the early 15th century when a secular response to premature death began to become more acceptable. The scene is generally shown in a humorous light and the victims are normally shown as wealthy. This foreshadows the themes of the later vanitas still life genre. But it is also thought there is a social message in these pictures: people of all classes are unified in the face of death. Equality is also present in the fact that dance is one way that most people, whether artistic or not, can create beauty, at least in their own minds. These themes of equality and the fact that some Danses Macabres only depicted skeletons are my justification for having only leaves of the same type.

From Danses Macabres des Femmes, Master of Philippe of Guelders , c1500
From Danses Macabres des Femmes, Master of Philippe of Guelders , c1500

Danse Macabre, Michael Wolgemut, 1493

Danse Macabre, Michael Wolgemut, 1493

From La Grant Danse Macabre des Hommes et des Femme, Nicolas Le Rouge, 1496

From La Grant Danse Macabre des Hommes et des Femme,
Nicolas Le Rouge, 1496


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